Welcome to the Marine Mammal and wildlife Research and Community Development Expedition blog where you can keep up to date with all the happenings and information from Kenya

Monday, February 1, 2010

Data analysis of Humpback dolphins GVI data from 2006-2009

I was sitting outside the cottage discussing the different types of hornbills found in Kenya, as a Trumpeter Hornbill had just flown over head, when Sergi (the marine officer of expedition 094) pulled me aside to talk about my independent project. I was secretly chuffed that I got given the one I did, as there was a choice of three. The title of my project was “Data Analysis of Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins Sousa chinesis collected by GVI Kenya Marine Team from 2006-2009.”

Humpback dolphin spyhoping in Wasini Channel

These animals are very shy animals and are not as well known as the bottlenose dolphins. Maybe because they are shy or perhaps because of their habitat distribution, there is very little data available. So this was a great opportunity to be able to provide some information.

The GVI Marine Team has been collecting data on them since 2006. Whilst out on the boat on a survey day, if we have a spotting we follow them around, taking photos and also monitor their behaviour. Using a GPS (Global Positioning System) we are able to plot the route taken by the dolphins that day. This allows us to see the areas where the humpbacks dolphins feed, rest, socialise, breed etc. As well as being able to gain data on group sizes and composition. So I went forth and did some research on our friends the humpbacks and also plotted the information on our study area (see picture) which is the Kisite and Mpunguti Marine Park and Reserve and the surrounding area. Humpback dolphins occur in small groups (3-7) and are distributed throughout Indian and Western Pacific ocean as well as the coast of south east Africa. Inhabiting tropical and subtropical waters (15oC - 20oC), they prefer coasts with mangroves, rocky reefs, estuaries and lagoons.

Humpback dolphin and Bottlenose dolphin share the waters of Kisite-Mpuntguti Marine Park

Typically found in waters less than 20m depth, they only venture a few miles from the shore line (as shown on the map), and occasionally they swim up rivers. The distinctive hump on their dorsal fin gives rise to their name; and they are medium sized 2.5m - 2.8m.

Humpback dolphin sightings from data collected by GVI volunteers 2006-2009

Wasini channel and the surrounding waters are prone to quite a lot of boat traffic and fishing. Humpbacks tend to avoid boats, although marks caused by propellers have been observed. This is a concern not only because of the damaged caused to the dolphin but also because of the resultant change in their behaviour, e.g. leaving the area. Another concern is that being situated on the coast; the communities living here depend upon fishing as a resource. Recent efforts have been made to educate some of the local community as to the importance and implications of over-fishing and pollutants.
It is my aim to develop a catalogue of the humpback dolphins, as this will allow us to determine population numbers and residency rates in this region. This is a technique called mark-recapture, and it uses the dorsal fins to identify each individual, mostly from the notches made by other dolphin or boats, but also by the shape, colour and size of the fins. Plus, on the cheeky side I will get to name some of them!

Sarah Watson was a conservation intern on 094 Expedition, and is currently doing her work placement with GVI, as staff member on the Marine and Terrestrial Program



Sergi said...

Good job Sara!!!!!congratulations!!!